This is a scam: now the pirate logo is a must-have fashion

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Forget cocktail dresses and crocodile “it bags” – the key trend now is t-shirts that don’t look inappropriate at market stalls.
Earlier this month, Balenciaga, the glamorous fashion show brand, launched its spring/summer advertising campaign. Key reference points? The legendary fashion brand of Edeka, a German supermarket chain, is a humble inspiration. The store brand’s yellow and blue colors are modified with the “power of dreams” and the Balenciaga logo.
This is just the latest example of fashion brands using existing brands in their designs to create trends that look like piracy. Demna Gvasalia, a designer at Balenciaga, has championed the idea, starting with his own Vetements brand. In 2016, the label produced a deeply discussed T-shirt with a DHL logo on it for 185 pounds. This year, Gvasalia provided Balenciaga with a $2,150 (1,606 pound) bag, looking very much like ikea’s 50p Frakta package.
Others are playing with the idea. Menswear designer Christopher Shannon made the autumn/winter collection using well-known sports brands. Timberland’s logo has been rebranded as “Tumbleweed,” and in the previous collection, shannon changed the logo of Sports Direct to “Direct lovers.” The stylish Visgil Abloh’s label “off-white” reshapes Nike’s iconic logo on a T-shirt with the word “logo” printed on it, and USES the logo of People magazine as a handbag. Gucci, the fashion giant, even imitates his own thieves. A sweater similar to fake and shoddy products, Gucci was replaced by “Guccy” and now sells for 950 on the website.
This reflects a trend that is taking place in the streets and in social media. Smaller street brands are using brands to create visual gimmicks that affect Instagram. Nike is welcome. “Sports Banger” is a label in tottenham, north London, used on a T-shirt that combines the NHS logo with Nike. At the same time, the clothes on the streets of the city are lagging behind the ubiquitous Jeremy Corbyn t-shirts, which replaced the labor leader’s sportswear brand last summer. This is the band cleaning the bandit, who in the background Corbyn T-shirt in a holiday shooting Grace Chatto. It’s sold out. Bowlcut prefers marlboro’s logo to “Mandem”. It is now a bestseller on the brand.
This trend has a fun political perspective – Bowlcut have a T-shirt, it reads, “the Tory club” by a sign of the giant enterprises on the background of the unusual reversal of corporate culture. “It’s about sneering at the elite, 1 percent, professional politicians, the right-wing press, we like to laugh at royalty,” said Bowlcut, who did not provide a surname, and remained anonymous. “It’s not a personal thing. We just let a lot of young people think.”
Christopher Shannon (Christopher Shannon) to CK T-shirt on the Liverpool (Liverpool) growth boots, at that time, the logo could be reused, so it looks like the DoCKers, to support the amazing dock workers. “I think it’s interesting to use a theme to convey information,” shannon said.

The t-shirts also carry nostalgia for the 1990s, when street brands such as Fuct often used recognisable signs from around the world, such as ford. Shannon mentioned the thieves found at a teenage market stall. “We call them garbage, which means fake goods,” he said.
This nostalgia is a branch of this trend – and is special for unofficial football. By levin, Fletcher (Reuven Fletcher) founded in 2016, football, Boolean (Bobbles) to include the celtics, Chelsea and Liverpool, the team to make the soccer gear, with b ha hat and bucket hat. Eighteen86, at the same time, is an online shop for non-official Arsenal merchandise, created by Max giles and Ed subdomains, and archived images of Ian Wright, Henry and Paul merson. Both labels focus on the era of millennial customer growth. “I asked my friends about the classic packaging that resonated,” Fletcher says. “A lot of it is about looking back to the 80s and 90s.”
Like the street labels, there is an atmosphere of resistance – one that appeals to football fans who do not want to pay more money to premier league clubs by visiting the gift shop. “It’s a good word for the authorities,” Giles said. “It’s unremarkable, it’s how everything is sterilized.” The duo were inspired by unofficial stalls where they had lined up on the streets of Arsenal’s Highbury to wait for their children to play.
Neil hurd (Neal Heard), “a Book” Football shirt (The Football Shirts Book) and “Lovers Football club” (Lovers FC) series of Football unlined upper garment designers The author thinks that The trend is associated with fans to return to The club. “It’s definitely a review, but I think it’s time for them to keep watching the club,” he said. “For years, we have loved our club, not what they produce. Now you can do what you want in the club. ”
Under the background of different use of existing logo or brand can bring the legal risks, but according to the founder of “fashion” website Julie Zerbo, many of them – especially in high fashion – there is a the appearance of piracy, but in fact is to cooperate with the powers of the brand. “Vetements work with DHL, and off-white gets People’s permission to use their logo,” she said. Otherwise, these cases will almost certainly become a case of trademark infringement. ”
Most of the business through social media means that these labels can grow through word of mouth, at the same time keep in a large enterprise (brand or club), under the radar of them expressed respect.
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Joe from Bowlcut, Giles and Fenwick said they were not asked to stop making their designs. Even if such respect is blatant, the brand may be ignored. Zerbo refers to Vetememes 22 Davil tram produced in 2016, instead of a raincoat, Vetements statement read “Vetements not any litigation in Vetememes raincoat, hope he enjoys his project as we make clothing. “This fits their brand,” says Zerbo. “Vetememes may not be a threat to the media’s impact on litigation.”
Neal Heard believes the shift in cooperation will continue. “When I was labeled as a white riot in the 1990s, we made Nike, adidas stripped… “He recalled. “We sold them to freedom and stopped sending letters.
“Now, we will be working together.”

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