Strike Pose: How Street Style Photography Stole Fashion Week

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Street-style stars, those who fashion-forward character, can be said to be the same as any model or celebrity as a trend. For example, JW Anderson in London, one of the hottest shows of this season, flocked to the entrance for more than 50 photographers looking for their photo prey, making it harder for people in less visible dresses to reach the door. In the past five years, this scene has grown exponentially. Shots outside live shows are just as influential and valuable as the models on a fashion show.

However, it is not a street-style star to take part in a photo worthy of a show. To do this you need a black photographer – now familiar with external shows, capturing editors, influencers and insiders – ready to take photos and then extract from Instagram feeds and street-style stars themselves, often becoming some of the other fad Feed However, these images are usually used without the permission of a photographer and are free of charge.
This fashion month, a group of about 40 photographers decided to draw attention to this issue, forming a coalition. During Milan Fashion Week, they launched #NoFreePhotos on social media. This event is targeted at influencers, bloggers and brands, and photographers say they earn money by using their images without sharing revenue. Impact and blogging are often paid by the brand, or at least compensated by free flights or clothes, in exchange for social media in their own clothing.

However, many photographers are freelancers, and some do not even have the money to take pictures. Adam Katz Sinding is such a photographer. He said he spent an average of 8,000 to 15,000 U.S. dollars each month between New York, London, Milan and Paris. Another photographer involved in #NoFreePhotos, Sinding and Valentina Frugiuele, declined to say how many photos they took. (Frugiulele once said “I do not even want to think about it”). Although each picture can be sold at a relatively low price, it is no exaggeration to say money shooting if the image is syndicated to different outlets in a season.

In stark contrast, the notoriety of being a street celebrity can have serious consequences. In a recent article, Zanita Whittington, a former model and influencer with more than 350,000 fans on Instagram, estimated she earned as much as $ 100,000 (£ 75,000) on a typical New York Fashion Week, Provided for each transaction. Street style is “an important part of her business,” and she knows how to play games to maximize her visibility in order to get the maximum picture possible. She said: “The trick is to come to the show.” “Then you can get more shots.”

According to the campaign press release, the photographer’s campaign will include removing the Instagram name of the person in the photo from the photo, not the brand tag worn in the photo. #NoFreePhotos The photographer will also contact the user for work if “no proper license is obtained and compensation for photographer” is used. If the problem is not resolved, they’ll reply to the image on social media with the #NoFreePhotos tag, effectively calling out the user. They will seek legal advice if needed.

For a long time, the street style of the show means the New York Times photographer Bill Cunningham, who died last year. He could see his blue jacket, ride on his bike, and gingerly open his clothes. He did this in one way or another from the late 1970s until he passed away, photographing the vitality that photographers are trying to duplicate today. He became a popular figure in the industry, Anna Wintour quipped: “We all dressed Bill.”

In 2017, fashion insiders wear clothes on street-style photographers and become a real business. With #NoFreePhotos activity, it’s basically pro. According to Sinding, the key is to correct the imbalance in the symbiotic relationship. “It’s about mutual respect,” he said. “Most influential people say they are unpaid and should not be the case … When you (a street-style photographer) share AirBnB with four or five people and fly to Ryanair They are at Ritz and Rolls-Royce, and obviously the brand is throwing money, it seems a bit trickier. ”

For a long time, the street style of the show means the New York Times photographer Bill Cunningham, who died last year. He could see his blue jacket, ride on his bike, and gingerly open his clothes. He did this in one way or another from the late 1970s until he passed away, photographing the vitality that photographers are trying to duplicate today. He became a popular figure in the industry, Anna Wintour quipped: “We all dressed Bill.”

In 2017, fashion insiders wear clothes on street-style photographers and become a real business. With #NoFreePhotos activity, it’s basically pro. According to Sinding, the key is to correct the imbalance in the symbiotic relationship. “It’s about mutual respect,” he said. “Most influential people say they are unpaid and should not be the case … When you (a street-style photographer) share AirBnB with four or five people and fly to Ryanair They are at Ritz and Rolls-Royce, and obviously the brand is throwing money, it seems a bit trickier. “

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